Tag Archives: Conference

CAA2012 Attend Online Registration Open!

21 Mar

Hello everyone!

We are just few days away from CAA2012 and I have very good news for those that couldn’t attend for any reason.

Over the course of the CAA 2012, we will be producing a series of eight videos on a variety of topics, including ‘Best of the Day’, ‘The Future of the CAA’, and ‘Is Archaeological Computing Changing?’.

All videos produced will be made available through this page, so please bookmark it if you intend to follow the conference online.

We will also be streaming the plenary session.

A timetable of online video content will be made available here nearer the date of the conference.

Register at CAA2012 attend online! and check all the possibilities that computing applications in Archaeology have for you!

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Computer Applications in Archaeology – Call for papers

7 Nov

Hey guys,

We are pleased to announce that the call for papers is open for our session in the CAA conference that is taking place at the University of Southampton in March 2012.

Loc(i) Motion: Current technologies and computational methodologies for exploring human movement in the past and present

Patricia Murrieta-Flores*, Angeliky Chrysanthi* and Stuart Dunn^

*University of Southampton

^King’s College London

Human movement and mobility has always been a challenging topic in the field of archaeology –involving research both in past and contemporary settings- due to the static nature of material culture which usually conditions both its interpretation and reception. Research on movement also, features in discourses pertinent to spatial perception, wayfinding and embodied experience providing thus, an ideal ground for interdisciplinary research.

Movement in past societies can be considered a scalar phenomenon whose study requires the consideration of diverse temporal and spatial scales. In order to understand how people travelled and moved during the past, it is necessary to delve into a series of theoretical and practical issues that range from the basic variables and factors that affect human movement such as physiology, perception, and social relationships, to the specific conditions of the environment in which the studied society lived. In the past decade, a wide range of computational approaches in different disciplines has been developed helping us to shed light into a variety of hypothesis related to human movement.

Similarly, current technological advances in motion capture, tracking systems and simulation techniques enable the study of human movement and the experience of moving both in real and virtual spaces; and to extrapolate from one to the other. This has unlocked a variety of new territories for research and practice-led work which informs the computer-mediated fields of heritage such as site and visitor management, fieldwork, serious games in cultural heritage, museology and visitor experience studies. It also allows us to (re) consider some of the assumptions that lie behind the capture and presentation of 3D imagery of archaeological features and environments.

The purpose of this session is to bring together the various technologies and computational methodologies used by archaeologists and other specialists that explore past and present human movement. We also welcome papers that examine potential lines of collaboration on this topic between a diversity of fields like physiology, psychology, archaeology, heritage management, design and computer science.

http://www.southampton.ac.uk/caa2012/submissions/index.html
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